Welcome to the Homepage of the Goodell Family of Concord, California


Okay, let's see what we can do with this thing ...


Whitney, 2011
Whoa. Whitney spotted this monster on a hike outside Vilcabamba, Ecuador.
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Moorea, 2012
Overlooking the thatched huts of the Sofitel Resort on Moorea. You can clearly see the coral reef separating the deep blue ocean and the shallow, aqua lagoon.

Nik & Whitney, 2008
We splurged on a touristy hotel stay just before leaving Bali, Indonesia.

Whitney, 2011
Mindo, Ecuador. Robbie, Whitney and Heather, swingin' and sippin' on batidos.
(Our kids have grown and are no longer posting blog stories here. Here now, are some highlights from past posts.)

Farewell, Dad

The day after Christmas marked the passing of Paul Goodell, Sr., known to friends and family as "Dik". Dad passed away at age 81, following a short illness.

Dad left Minnesota to enlist in the US Navy during World War II, seeing action in the South Pacific aboard the submarine USS Rasher. Following the War, Dad remained in the Navy, married and raised a family, while stationed mostly at the Pearl Harbor Submarine Base in Hawaii.

After a 20-year career in the Navy, Dad moved the family to California, where he accumulated a second 20-year career working for the Lawrence Livermore National Lab. He then was fortunate enough to enjoy a retirement career longer than either of those!

Posted by Dan 01/15/2008, revised 01/27/2008

Snippets of Life - Part 4: La vida hermosa

March low tides - another fantastic week of field work! This time around, we went to some of the experiment sites that I had not yet been to... which were located on some of the most beautiful beaches of Ecuador! Once again, I feel so fortunate to be in the field of work that I'm in. At the experimental sites, I would look up from my work and glance around at the blue water, long stretches of fine sand, curling waves, and puffy white clouds, and I would have to take a brief moment to breathe it all in and smile.

One of the beaches I got to enjoy, Playita, is actually closed to the public, as it is a very important and fragile breeding ground for sea turtles. But with a piece of paper that grants permission to conduct scientific research in that location, we get to enjoy a pristine beach all to ourselves!


Beautiful Playita, closed to the public

Another perk of the research permit manifested itself at another experimental site, located in Machalilla National Park. Entrance into this area is something like $15 for foreigners, but with a wave of our permit, in we go for free! And what a beach it is!


Machalilla National Park, where one of the study sites is located

A beautiful life lends itself to beautiful photos. Enjoy.

March low tides photo album
http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=2351045&id=19700757&l=cb4dc98eaf

Posted by Whitney 04/08/2011

It Begins

Bangkok is one of those cities that makes an impression the second you get there. However after you get over the smell and the traffic there actually is some wonderful wonders to be found. We were fortunate enough to be staying with a couchsurfer and he acted as our tour guide while we were in the city. Our first day we made our way by train, boat and taxi to Canchanaburi where there is a train bridge.


Jen got over the wonderful wonders quick.

Posted by nik 09/14/2008, revised 09/21/2008

Being Comfortable With Discomfort

I write this with Janice in mind, although it likely applies to nearly every endurance athlete I coach, train with, or compete against. We all start with some type of lofty goal; completing an Ironman, or cycling around Lake Michigan, or maybe trying to break some specific record (our own or someone else's). In Janice's case, she's swimming across Lake Mendota, as part of the Gills for Gilda's charity event. Lake Mendota is 6 miles across, so a swim of this magnitude is something very few of us will ever dare to confront.

Once the goal is set, the training plan is put in place, and the work begins, we usually feel a pleasing sense of determination and courage at the start of the journey. There are good training days, and there are bad training days, but inevitably, at some point in the weeks leading up to the Big Day (for me it usually happens the morning of), you suddenly find yourself anxiously wondering, "Wait ... Do I actually have to go through with this?"



Posted by Kimberly 08/18/2014